click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
Today 20
( more )
STATION
CNNW 76
MSNBCW 54
CNN 41
FOXNEWS 32
CSPAN 30
KGO (ABC) 29
CSPAN2 25
MSNBC 24
CNBC 21
WRC 16
KNTV (NBC) 15
KPIX (CBS) 15
WUSA (CBS) 12
FBC 9
WBAL (NBC) 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 541
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 541 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several times ago actually issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last se
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
. >>> all right. the united states marine corps band is now going by the reviewing stand. the president is there with the co comb don't of the u.s. marine corps. now it's the marines. it's the marines turn. so you know what, let's pay homage. let's respect the united states marines. ♪ ♪ that is a beautiful shot. the u.s. marine corps being honored. now the chinese-american community center folk dance troupe from delaware, the home state of the vice president of the united states. we're getting a little different cultural -- this is a little cultural dancing. but who knew they were from delaware, these dancers have performed, by the way, not only here, but the kennedy center, the smithsonian, the wilmington brand opera house, play house theater, national theater. this is an excellent, excellent folk dance troupe. >> as you look close, you can see these people are working really hard as they're approaching. this is the tail end of their parade as they get to the reviewing stand so they're really working hard. >> they haven't had a lot of time to practice. the election ended, then the
in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the president pro tempore: the majority leader. mr. reid: would the chair announce the business for the day. the president pro tempore: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order the senate will be in a period of morning business until 1:30 p.m. for debate only, with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. durbin: mr. president? the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: after any statement by the majority leader, i'd ask consent to be recognized in morning business. the president pro tempore: without objection. mr. durbin: it is my understanding the majority leader is going to yield the floor to me at this moment. the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: mr. president, the state of nevada was admitted to the union in 1864. since 1864 there have
men and women side by side in combat would be distracting, harmful, and awkward for unit cohesion. >> i think people are being awfully cavalier about this restriction being lifted. combat is a life or death game. if we get this wrong, the loser dies. >> republican senators sounded alarm bells saying congress may have to put the brakes on the de deal, and family research groups weighed in. one asking how much national security is our president willing to forego to promote this kind of progressive feminism. not every republican feels this way. buck mckeon said he welcomes the announcement, and people on both sides of the aisle said it's totally normal if you speak dutch, hebrew, polish, or f finnish. in addition, there's the inescapable fact that in modern war fare, the lines are blurry. meaning troops in noncom bat roles can end up in combat. >> when i got to baghdad, my first foray out of the operating base, i hopped into the humvee and i asked the driver who he was, where he was from? i said, who are you? she leaned down and said, i'm amanda. i said, okay. >> tammy duckworth lost
. >> the house will be in order. if the people will take their seats? >> mr. speaker, the unit -- the u.s. senate. [applause] [applause] >> mr. speaker, members of congress, pursuant to the constitutional laws of the united states, senate, and house of representatives are meeting in joint session to count the points -- count the votes of the electorate of several states. after we have been able to ascertain that certificates have been had, it will be made by the several states. they take their place at the clerk's desk. the tellers will dispense by reading formal readings of the certificates. after confirming the certificates are authentic, begin with each state, beginning with alabama. >> mr. president, the certificate of the state of alabama seems to be authentic and it appears that mitt romney received nine votes for president and paul ryan received nine votes for vice president. >> mr. president, the certificate of the state of alaska seems to be authentic. it appears that mitt romney received three votes for president and paul ryan received three votes for vice president. >> mr. president, t
. we know from private organizations that infrastructure in the united states needs repair. we know from examples in other countries that if you have proper infrastructure it over time attracts business and we can shed this whole nonsense about taking on debt for our grandchildren if we create a place where it's fascinating and profitable to do business. >> and it's economic security for your grandchildren. i guess this becomes a message that has to change here where instead of talking about spending and federal government getting bigger and more involved in the economy and your life we have to be talking about investing and using the government the way it should be to invest and put us in the right position so we can compete with the rest of the world that by the world is going crazy doing infrastructure spending using cash in many cases to do it, something we don't have. >> just changing the words won't fix it. obama has also said investing as a synonym for spending. investing has to be investing. >> if we can't get behind a no-brainer like this, a public/private infrastructure ba
. >>> coming up next, more on title ix. the investigative unit exposes another school ignoring title ix this time involving alleged sex abuse and the teacher. joo [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues ] [ gasping ] >>> welcome back. now more on title ix. a disturbing case, a south bay teacher charged with sexually abusing five of his students while he awaits trial, the investigative unit has uncovered the school district violated that federal law designed to protect students in situations just like this one. >> translator: she loves to read. it's her favorite thing to do. >> reporter: a mother's love for her child felt in her words. >> translator: she is an adorable, pretty child, very quiet. >> reporter: a tie so strong, her greatest pain, witnessing her little girl suffer. >> translator: it's bad. >> reporter: their daughter went to whalwhalwha
not the mission of the second airborne are 101st or even the marine corps. 19,000 troops, two units had prepared, had been given advance notice and were prepared. why all this for one african american student who wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. when you w
. >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend. >>> have the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> there won't be a doover because the actual swearing in took place yesterday. also unlike last time, the first time ever to mention rights for, equal rights for gays and lesbians and a much bolder statement in many ways in mr. obama's governing philosophy from here on out. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls and stone wall, a it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every s
in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and the law forbidding the adoption of russian children, a huge part of it was the homosexual lobby. russia was a communist nation, atheist, and these people take god serious now in these countries. host: richard, thanks for the call and thanks for adding your voice and perspective to the conversation. kevin cathcart. guest: i hardly know where to start, but first of all, there are gay people in every country in the world, and the movement for lgbt civil rights around the world are home run in these countries. they are not steer
like immigration, for instance, i think this is something that could actually unite us again as a country because americans know that's who we are as a people. we're a country of immigrants. we've really benefitted tremendously from being able to tap human potential from all over the world. but you can't do it from the point of view of "i'm going to put this down and then you take it or leave it" because there are some deep divisive-- divisive issues within the immigration debate that are going to have to be smooth over. so the american people-- i live out in california. i don't live here in washington. and i will tell you that out in the country there's a sense that washington is divided and that's not a good thing for america. >> let me just take a break here. we'll talk about this. i sure want to get back to talking about guns a little bit. but we'll take a break here for one minute. we're sitting on a bunch of shale gas. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it
the policy barring women in the military from combat units. but another priority, strength ling gun laws, will be much harder. >> these weapons do not belong on the street of our towns, our cities, in our schools, in our malls, in our workplaces, in our movie theaters. enough is enough. >> schieffer: almost 20 years ago, california democrat dianne feinstein pushed an vault weapons ban through congress. can she do it again, and is it the answer? she's with us this morning along with new york city's top cop ray kelly. as president begins his second term, republicans are rethinking who they are and where they go here. >> we can't get rattled. we won't play the villain in his morality plays. we have to stay united. >> schieffer: we'll hear more on that from newt gingrich. tennessee republican representative, marsha blackburn. for analysis, being bring there david ignatius of the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and from campaign 2012, obama adviser stephanie cutter, and romney adviser kevin madden. back to face off one more time because this is "face the nation." capt
blitzer begins right now. >> don, thanks very much. happening now, the united states senator talks about the traumatic day she tried to find a pulse by putting her finger into the bullet hole of a colleague who had just been shot. now she wants to ban 158 kinds of assault weapons. dispute all the iphones, the tablets, ipods and a whole lot more there are out there, perhaps in your hands right now, apple's day as a wall street darling potentially, potentially could be over. wait until you hear how the stock got clobbered today and why. >>> and football star manti te'o opens up about the hoax that fooled him and the rest of the country. it's the interview that so many people have been waiting for. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with a new effort to ban 158 specific assault-style weapons and prohibit other guns from using magazines containing more than ten rounds of ammunition. those are just two of the provisions of a bill put forward today by united states senator whose own hands were bloodied by one of the most notorious shootings in california history. da
. and a lot of faith that just as they had made the united states what it was between 1778 and 1860 they could succeed and make the other country independent and they could build a proper nation state in the 19th century sense of the word on the basis of cotton and slaves. they talked about this a lot. at the time of succession and for the first couple of years of war. they compared themselves to other european countries in population, resources, value of trade. they were riding high. i think it's the confederacy often misunderstood. we tend to think of as defensive move. they were losing in the union. they decided to, you know, take this gamble. they did take a gamble. they were only slave holding class in the 19th century war who did it. the brazilian, cuban didn't. why did they do it? that's an interesting question. i try to explain a little bit in the book. what was mind set. it's completely fascinating to get inside the mind of the incredibly powerful not just in terms of social power and wealth but political power of this planter elite. they were used to running the united states and the
. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republicans. host: ok, sylvia. on twitter -- look at some other stories in the news. this is from the houston chronicle, which we get courtesy of the newseum. a shooting close as a local campus. that's the houston chronicle. here in washington, general allen was cleared of misconduct. and e-mail found during betray its inquiry -- during the general petraeus's inquiry involved general allen. whether he exchanged inappropriate e-mails with the same quarter socialite's that prompted david petraeus to resign as cia director.
to seek exceptions to certain units. some of the special operations units for instance. women who have been affected by the ban say they were denied promotions as a result of the discriminatory policy over the years, bill. bill: jennifer, women have for some time have contributed to mightily to the war on terror. they drive tanks. they knife airplanes in the air force. a lot of people don't recognize that. what then has been the reaction from women in the military on this decision? >> reporter: well, remember, women have been serving in front line positions in the last 10 years. mostly has helicopter pilots, as medics. they have have been serving valiantly. this will change quite a bit and the aclu and several servicemembers, women servicemembers sued to have positions in the infantry, front line positions opened up. they have welcomed this. as have both democrats and republicans on capitol hill yesterday. however one female marine who garnered attention late last year when she expressed concerns about this anticipated move is captain katie petronia we intervurd her. she served in fron
to designate the facility of united states postal service located at 401 old dixie highway in jupiter, florida, as the roy post office building. the first lieutenant, the brigadier general post office building. the nicky nick daniel bacon post office. >> in the last congress, lawmakers passed 45 bills renaming post offices. it did not get around to a bill overhauling the postal system to keep it solvent. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you from davos, switzerland. i interviewed one king, seven prime ministers and one head of government. we'll see them in coming weeks. this week one king and one prime minister. we'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits in turmoil between syria, egypt, iraq and saudi arabia. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy
something the other day and it is nothing more than a unit of communication. so i started looking into this. a lot of research and looking into the presidents. the storyline in this, it is in a tizzy buck. so some of this stuff is funny and some of it is not so funny. what's really the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the early beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and what this country was. there is a letter written between benjamin franklin and noah webster. in which they talk about the witness acts of rebellion against the british. and the use of various words to talk about it. but they are really sort of american acts to identify who we are as a people. one of the acts is public libraries. coming to this country, his father came smuggling a bible. he tells benjamin at one point that one of the things we could do is be a printer. the idea that when england come at that time, when his father came over, i was very interested in these definitions and so when he creates a free library of philadelphia, is seen as an act of resistance against the british.
of the national commission on terrorist attacks upon the united states, better known as the 9/11 commission. the commission found that 18 of the 9/11 hijackers had 30 ids between them, including six that were used on the morning of the attack. the commission called on the federal government to set standards for the issuance of birth certificates and secure identification such as driver's licenses. recognizing that sources of identification are the last opportunity to make sure people are who they say the art and to help hold gary sick to be. the real id act is not just an important tool for holding terrorist activity and security. it's also an important tool for helping to combat fraud and identity theft. passed in 2005, the real id act sets voluntary standards for the states to meet regarding id security speak these include facial recognition capture, improved document authenticity, data verification between face come increased card security, enhanced issuer integrity, and lawful status checks on noncitizens applicants. by meeting these standards state ids will be acceptable for official p
oil companies in the united states. they are here because they don't get those kind of benefits in norway or sweden. i get gas royalties out of ohio from a french company. they get 30% they don't even pay tax on. we have to run a country. i think simpson-bowles is the right direction, but i don't think simpson-bowles goes far enough. at one time i thought steve forbes' idea was great, but he wants to keep a certain piece of money that is an entitlement. guest: and makes a very good point that we have got to have the kind of pro-growth tax reform that simplifies the system, broadens the base, lower rates, but that stimulates economic growth and economic development. that means not only getting people back to work but it is the growing economy that creates more revenue, not higher taxes. the growth and the revenues from growth is what we really need to address the deposition and debt. often we don't focus on that enough in the scoring, like the cbo, congressional budget office scoring you see all the time, the revenue from growth is not factored in. in anything we put together a,
where he says i'm the united states senator, i took an oath to our constitution, not to israel. well, who was he saying that to? >> that's an incredible slap, eliot. >> yeah. >> i read with great interest your rendition of the story. that was an usa operation working very, very well with an israeli leader and israeli general or something like that which he closed down. but this thing what you just said now, can you repeat that? because nobody talks like that nowadays. nobody talks like that. >> right. this was an interview he did a couple of years ago where he said -- this is the one where he used the term jewish lobby. but he also said, you know, i'm a united states senator, i'm not an israeli senator and i took an oath to pour constitution. one of the problems if the senate says okay to this is what it's saying okay to really is a new level of anti-jewish rhetoric. this is something we had driven out of public life. you can disagree about policy with respect to israel, but that's a challenge of dual loyalty. >> and from what i gather, senators like chuck schumer and menendez and ot
on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during the obama administration, 1.5 million. for the entirity of the bush administration, two terms in office, we saw about two million deportations. and then in 2012 alone, nearly -- more than, rather, 400,000 immigrants deported, which is a record high. our next phone call is from mark in new jersey, republican. hi, mark. caller: good morning. i'm also a municipal chair here for the republican committee. i'm al
's intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> sir, do you agree it's provocative statement. i can't think of a more provocative thing to say about the relationship between the united states and israel and the senate or the congress than what you said. name one dumb thing we have been goaded in to do because of the pressure of the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the term nlg. >> you said back then it makes us do dumb things. you can't name one senator intimidated. now give me one example of the dumb things we're pressured to do up here. >> we were talking in that interview about the middle east. about positions. about israel. >> now that exchange followed another faceoff earlier today with senator john mccain over the war in iraq. >> will you please answer the question? will you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since until nam? were you co
direct part in new un sanctions. this is in the wake of new north korean threats against the united states. cnn pentagon correspondent looked into how dangerous the nuclear capability really is. what are you hearing there sf. >> the rhetoric out of pyongyang is very hot. the question you raise is the one the administration has to take a look at. how real and dangerous is the nuclear threat? >> north korea's latest saber rattles threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said they will have missiles and conduct a new nuclear test leaving now doubt kim jung un is not giving up his father's nuclear program. >> they have the capability to conduct the tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing. >> there signs they are ready to test if ordered. >> they are maintaining fairly high state of readiness at the test site. if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> satellite shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly, a bunker for personnel and equipment and a
and credit of the united states is not a bargaining chip. they had better choose quickly, because time is running short. the last time republicans in congress even flirted with this idea, r. triple-a credit rating was downgraded for the first time in our mystery, our businesses created the few jobs in any month in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well
unconstitutional measure, edict, that's being issued by the president of the united states. we need to send a clear message to the federal government that we're not going to continue what we enforce what we believe to be unconstitutional laws. >> different issue, same words. states' rights. back in the 1950s and '60s, local police often stood by and refused to enforce new civil rights laws. now, some conservative sheriffs say they'll refuse to enforce new gun control laws from washington because they may consider them unconstitutional. today's conservatives aren't opposing the right of our children to go to school. but they are standing in the way of our children going to school safely. that's why president obama is proposing these strong, common sense solutions to gun violence. >> that most fundamental set of rights to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. fundamental rights that were denied to college stunts dents virginia tech and elementary school students in newtown and kids on street corners in chicago. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> we're all responsible for protec
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 541 (some duplicates have been removed)